Skip to content

What do we mean by creativity? Do you know it when you see it? How do you recognise it? How can we assess it in ways that are credible but don't standardise and thus undermine the very concept of creativity? ...continue reading "Assessing creativity"

1

Collins English Dictionary defines curriculum as "all the different courses of study that are taught in a school, college, or university".  This is a rather narrow definition, focussing as it does on the explicit curriculum. I am going to redefine curriculum as what students need to learn (with my focus being specifically on what school age learners need to learn). ...continue reading "Some thoughts on curriculum"

Collins English Dictionary defines pedagogy as "the study and theory of the methods and principles of teaching". Personally I think that is too teacher centric, so I am going to use pedagogy to mean the theory and practices of (effective) ways to support human learning. ...continue reading "Some thoughts on pedagogy"

1

High stakes summative assessment drives practice in schools (because these are the metrics against which schools and teachers are judged). Traditional exams, which are the predominant form of summative assessment, cannot capture evidence about many 'learning outcomes' that are seen as being critical - such as collaboration, real problem solving, creativity, or persistence. AI, in the form of data mining, may offer a solution. ...continue reading "AI and assessment – mining learning outcomes"

We know that summative assessment drives practice in schools. We also know that current forms of summative assessment inhibit both curriculum and pedagogical innovation because of their focus on 'knowledge' (as viewed in a knowledge based curriculum). The challenge is to find new forms of summative assessment which satisfy the criteria against which they will be judged. Those criteria should include: ...continue reading "Characteristics of effective summative assessment"

By Roger Broadie

Having spent 35 years of my life trying to help schools embrace the digital revolution, that has so dramatically changed almost every other aspect of life, my conclusions on why schools seem so resistant have come as a shock. But there have to be reasons why ...continue reading "The digital revolution is irrelevant to schools"

Michael Merrick (@michael_merrick)
Scratch the surface of the ‘21st century skills’ brigade, & the justification you always seem to get revolves around serving the market/business/tech sector. Which is more dystopian (and properly Gradgrindian) than any school getting a bit over-zealous with a knowledge curriculum

I feel this needs a response of more than 280 characters. So here it is ...  ...continue reading "21st century skills are important because …"

A version of this article was originally published on the OU News Website on the 25th July 2018

In my previous piece (5 reasons why mobile phones should not be banned in schools) I argued that teachers should actively encourage the use of mobile phones in schools. This is not a trivial task. ...continue reading "6 tips for teachers on using mobile phones in classrooms"

A version of this article was originally published on the Open University News website on the 25th July 2018.

There is a lot of hype around the problems caused by mobile phones in schools. ...continue reading "5 reasons why mobile phones should not be banned in schools"

This article was originally published in The Conversation on the 4th February 2014

Nrsptdps 1391427468.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1
Not just for games. flickingerbrad

Computing is an important subject, but it is only one of many that schools have to teach, and few would argue that it is more important than English, maths, or science. But ...continue reading "Backlash against computing curriculum misses the point"