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It seems reasonable to want to be able to evaluate the effectiveness of public schooling. The problem is that the metrics that are currently used are inadequate and distort practice. Would the subjective well-being of the school community be a better metric and if so how could you measure it? ...continue reading "Subjective well-being – the ultimate metric?"

Are you familiar with the game rock, paper, scissors? (Rock beats scissors, paper beats rock, scissors beats paper). I think we need a modern version: COVID-19, education, neoliberalism. Let me explain ... ...continue reading "COVID-19, education, neoliberalism"

Currently our education system is dominated by a grades-based approach to assessment - but is this the best approach (from an educational perspective)? ...continue reading "Rethinking assessment – from grades to micro-credentials"

Bob Harrison responds to official comments (in England) about 'remote learning'

As I judged the entries for the Learning Reimagined Awards – which celebrate the most inspirational uses of technology for learning around the world – I could not help reflect on how incredibly quaint and outdated these innovations make the Department for Education’s (DfE's) remote education efforts look. ...continue reading "Online learning – there is nothing remote about it"

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By Dennis Sherwood

We all know that old cliché 'Necessity is the mother of invention', and events over the past nine months have validated its truth: that wretched virus has caused many new things to happen, from enhanced remote teaching at all educational levels to the ever-closer development of a vaccine.

Why has there been such an outburst of the discovery of new ideas, of creativity? ...continue reading "Thinking differently about creativity"

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We know that summative assessment drives practice in schools. We also know that current forms of summative assessment inhibit both curriculum and pedagogical innovation because of their focus on 'knowledge' (as viewed in a knowledge based curriculum). The challenge is to find new forms of summative assessment which satisfy the criteria against which they will be judged. Those criteria should include: ...continue reading "Characteristics of effective summative assessment"

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Do you have to develop a PhD (or maybe even a Masters) thesis?
Is your research qualitative (which can include generating numerical as well as non-numerical data within a relativist approach)?

If you've answered yes to both those questions then this thesis template may be what you have been looking for ... ...continue reading "The halfbaked thesis template"

Traditionally we have told students that if they work hard at school and get good results they can go to university and upon graduation will get a good job.

The story we traditionally told students

Such stories are no longer true (I wonder whether they were ever true for many people). Our career pathways are more complex than that. Here's my story - ...continue reading "What do you want to be when you grow up?"

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In the Industrial Age schooling was focussed on preparing folk for working on production lines - standardisation was the name of the game and standardised testing was an appropriate way to enhance schooling. Today, in the Automation Age, we need to prepare young people to tackle wicked problems - standardised testing is no longer fit for purpose. We need new ways to assess the knowledge, competences and dispositions that people need to succeed ... ...continue reading "From standardised testing to living CVs"

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Schools tend to focus heavily on end of Year 12 exams (e.g. HSCs and the ATAR in Australia) that will enable students to progress to university. However, most students do NOT go on to university and of those who do many do not rely on an ATAR to get their place. It is time that schools focussed on the success ...continue reading "Starting to think about Additional Routes To Success"